Affiliates

Paul Attewell

Paul Attewell
Professor of Sociology and Urban Education
Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Show Bio

Paul Attewell holds the title of Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Urban Education at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His current research focuses on higher education and in particular the hurdles that prevent young adults from low income backgrounds from succeeding in college. Along with his graduate students he has published articles on the community college route to the BA; on the efficacy of bridge programs between high school and college; on the impact of summer school programs in college; on remedial coursework in college; and on the effect of college selectivity on undergraduates ’ graduation chances.

With support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, he has carried out a series of Randomized Control Trials looking at interventions among low-income community college students, assessing their impacts on graduation rates. That ongoing research tracks the students until graduation.With his co-author, David E. Lavin, he wrote Passing the Torch: Does Higher Education for the Disadvantaged Pay Off Across the Generations? which received the American Educational Research Association's Outstanding Book Award and was also the winner of the University of Louisville's Grawemeyer Award in Education. Most recently, he has published a book on Data Mining methods for the Social Sciences and education, one product of a grant that he received from the National Science Foundation to build an interdisciplinary research community of computer scientists and social and behavioral scientists  applying these new quantitative methods to social science and education data.


Markie Blumer Markie Blumer 
Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies
University of Wisconsin-Stout

Show Bio

Markie Louise Christianson (L. C.) Blumer is an Associate Professor in the Human Development and Family Studies Department/Marriage and Family Therapy Program, and a Center for Applied Ethics Scholar (2013-2014) at the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout). She earned her doctorate in Human Development and Family Studies with specialization in Marriage and Family Therapy from Iowa State University. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist (IA, NV), and mental health counselor (IA). Dr. Blumer’s research primarily focuses on social justice concerns for persons whose gender, relational and sexual orientations have been minoritized. Secondarily, her research focuses on: academic success for at-risk adolescents, family and ecological sustainability, couple and family therapy technological practices, research cultures in university settings, and clinical work with individuals, couples, and families experiencing unemployment and economic hardships. She recently co-authored her first book, The Couple and Family Technology Framework: Intimate Relationships in a Digital Age, and has published approximately 30 articles, 7 book chapters, and presented over 100 times at various local, regional, national and international conferences. Across her academic tenure, Dr. Blumer has won numerous awards for her teaching and research, including the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) New Professional Award (2007), the NCFR Family Therapy Section Best Research Paper Award (2011), and both the UW-Stout Debra Davis Award for Transgender Advocacy (2013) and Faculty Ally Award (2013).


Clare CadyClare Cady
Co-Director and Co-Founder
College and University Food Bank Alliance

Show Bio

Clare Cady's work rests at the intersection of higher education and human services practice. She directed the Oregon State University Human Services Resource Center, a nationally-recognized program focused on serving students experiencing poverty, hunger, homelessness and food insecurity. Her work on student economic crisis and food insecurity has been published in the NASPA Journal of College and Character, as well as highlighted on NPR, USA Today, Yahoo! Business, MSNBC, and the Huffington Post. Clare co-founded the College and University Food Bank Alliance (CUFBA), and NASPA Socioeconomic and Class Issues in Higher Education Knowledge Community, and has supported over 60 campuses in starting programs to support students in need. She recently published a journal article, “Food Insecurity as a Student Issue,” from the Journal of College and Character. Clare currently serves as Senior Program Officer for National College Program at Single Stop, an anti-poverty nonprofit that partners with community colleges across the United States to serve low-income students.


Russell CannonRussell Cannon
Director of Institutional Research
University of Washington Bothell

Show Bio

Russell Cannon is the Director of Institutional Research at the University of Washington Bothell, the country's fastest growing university and one that has been recognized for its value-added combination of high access and high student outcomes. His team supports institutional mission alignment through analysis focused on institutional effectiveness and student success, pursuit of institutional infrastructure grants, and participation in institutional planning and decision-making. He has been a leader of regional initiatives focused on student learning outcomes assessment and the applications of institutional research to student success. He is the former Director of Institutional Research, Assessment, and Planning at Beloit College and, prior to his work in higher education, taught social studies in Trenton and Camden New Jersey. He holds a holds a Bachelor’s degree in Public and International Affairs from Princeton University, a Master’s Degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago where he received support from the federal James Madison Fellowship Program, and a PhD in Educational Policy Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he worked with the Wisconsin HOPE Lab since its inception.


J. Michael CollinsJ. Michael Collins
Faculty Director of Center for Financial Security
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Show Bio

J. Michael Collins is faculty director of the Center for Financial Security at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is an Associate Professor at the  the La Follette School of Public Affairs and at the School of Human Ecology. He is also a family economics specialist for UW-Extension, Cooperative Extension, and an affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty and Center for Demography and Ecology.Collins studies consumer decision-making in the financial marketplace, including the role of public policy in influencing credit, savings and investment choices.  His work includes the study of financial capability with a focus on low-income families. He is involved in studies of household finance and well-being supported by leading foundations and federal agencies. He holds a Masters from the John F. Kennedy School of Government, a PhD from Cornell University, and a BS from Miami University (OH).


Ben CastlemanBen Castleman
Assistant Professor of Education and Public Policy
University of Virginia

Show Bio

Ben Castleman is an Assistant Professor of Education and Public Policy at the University of Virginia and is the Faculty Director of the University of Virginia-US Army Partnership on the Educational Trajectories of Soldiers and their Dependents. Ben’s research applies insights from behavioral economics and social psychology to improve college access and success for low-income and non-traditional students. He has conducted several randomized trials to investigate innovative strategies to deliver high-quality information about the college-going process to students and their families, and to ease the process of students and families getting professional support when they need assistance. Ben’s work has been published in The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, The Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, Social Sciences Quarterly, and New Directions for Youth Development. Ben’s research has been generously supported by The Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The W.T. Grant Foundation, The Heckscher Foundation for Children, The Kresge Foundation, The Lumina Foundation, The Spencer Foundation, and The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. His research has received extensive media coverage, including National Public Radio’s Morning Edition, Time Magazine, USA Today, and The Huffington Post.  Ben is a recipient of a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship and a Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Dissertation Fellowship. He is a Lumina Foundation/Institute for Higher Education Policy Academic Fellow, and is a recipient of the K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders award, given annually by The Association of American Colleges and Universities.


Nicole DeterdingNicole Deterding
Postdoctoral Fellow
National Poverty Center

Show Bio

Nicole Deterding earned her PhD in Sociology and Social Policy at Harvard University.  Her work examines the relationship between education and the labor market for economically vulnerable students.  She is particularly interested in the role of the growing for-profit sector in educating disadvantaged students.  Prior to beginning her doctorate, Nicole worked on large implementation and impact studies of higher education interventions as a Research Associate for The Urban Institute and earned a Master's Degree in Education Policy Studies from The George Washington University. Nicole’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT Program, The RISK Project, The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, and the Multidisciplinary Program on Inequality and Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.


Ray FrankeRay Franke
Assistant Professor of Higher Education
University of Massachusetts Boston

Show Bio

Ray Franke is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Massachusetts Boston. His research interests include higher education finance and financial aid, education policy, and organizational change in the U.S. and internationally. His recent work has examined how federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs and policy affects access to and success in higher education for students from different income and racial/ethnic backgrounds. Dr. Franke has articles forthcoming or currently under review in the American Educational Research Journal, Research in Higher Education, and Higher Education Policy. His work was featured by the American Educational Research Association, Inside Higher Ed, and the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and he has been quoted in the media, including CNBC, MSNBC, and The Boston Globe. In the doctoral program at UMass Boston, he teaches courses on higher education finance, governance and administration, and quantitative research methods. Dr. Franke earned his Ph.D. in Higher Education and Organizational Change from the University of California, Los Angeles. He also pursued undergraduate and graduate studies in Germany and Spain and earned his M.A. in Business Economics from the University of Oldenburg. He has previous work experience in the corporate sector, working for Bertelsmann, and served as a consultant for the Wittenberg Institute for Research on Higher Education in Germany.


Laura HamiltonLaura Hamilton
Associate Professor of Sociology
University of California-Merced

Show Bio

Laura Hamilton holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Indiana University. She is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California-Merced. Her first book (co-authored with Elizabeth Armstrong), Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality, argues that universities respond to increasing financial pressures by organizing social and academic life around the needs and interests of students who can pay—at the cost of everyone else. In her second book, currently in progress, she shifts focus to parents of college students, and looks at the importance of parental cultural, social, and financial resources, as well as how they are applied, for college student success. Laura is currently working on collating an array of information about the internal structure of universities and colleges into a database, and linking it to existing post-secondary datasets focused on individual student attributes. Her interest is identifying the features of postsecondary institutions, beyond those typically examined, that increase the likelihood of success for low-income and minority students.


Judith Harackiewicz

Judith Harackiewicz
Professor of Psychology
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Show Bio

Judith Harackiewicz is Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and she has been studying motivation and  interest for over 30 years with her graduate students, conducting experimental and longitudinal studies of achievement goals, competition, value transmission and performance evaluation in academic and athletic contexts. One line of recent research concerns the role of parents in communicating the value of academics to their teens. She tested an intervention aimed at helping parents motivate their teens to take more math and science courses, and found that a simple intervention lead to high school students taking, on average, an additional semester of math or science in their last two years of high school. For this work, she and her colleagues were awarded the 2013 Cialdini Award from SPSP, "for the publication that best explicates social psychological phenomena through the use of field research methods and thereby demonstrates the relevance of the discipline to communities outside of academic social psychology.”  She is currently testing motivational interventions in college biology courses with randomized control trials, working to promote interest and performance in the foundational course that serves as a gateway to biomedical careers.


Daphne HernandezDaphne Hernandez
Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Obesity Studies 
    Department of Health and Human Performance
University of Houston 

Show Bio

Daphne Hernandez is an assistant professor of nutrition and obesity studies in the department of health and human performance at the University of Houston. Her health disparities research agenda examines the determinants and consequences of food insecurity and obesity among socio-economically disadvantaged and vulnerable groups, including racial and ethnic minorities, women, and children. She received training across several social science disciplines during her graduate and postdoctoral studies that has provided her the opportunity to publish in top-ranking journals for the fields of family studies, child development, and public health. Her research has been previously funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and is currently funded by the USDA and Weight Watchers International. Her scholarly accomplishments have been recognized by the National Council on Family Relations Family Health Section Best Professional Paper Award (2015). Her work has also been recognized nationally by several media outlets, including Time magazine.


Braden HoschBraden Hosch
Assistant Vice President for Institutional Research, Planning,
    and Effectiveness
Stony Brook University

Show Bio

Braden Hosch is the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Research, Planning, and Effectiveness at Stony Brook University where he leads all aspects of institutional research, helps shape policy and planning, and oversees institutional effectiveness efforts. Braden conducts large-scale national benchmarking for institution and state-level use, including metrics for finance and institutional effectiveness, and he contributes actively to state, regional, national and international efforts to advance quality and accountability in higher education. In recent years, he has been a leader in international and national initiatives, such as the Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO) project and serves as a national IPEDS trainer through the Association for Institutional Research (AIR). Prior to his position at Stony Brook, he served as Director of Policy & Research and Interim Director of Academic Affairs at the Connecticut Board for Higher Education, where he led accountability initiatives, helped shape policy for higher education, oversaw statewide data collections, and led higher education research operations and initiatives. Prior to this, he served as Chief Academic Officer at the Connecticut Department of Higher Education in which role he oversaw areas for finance and policy as well as academic quality assurance. He has taught and held administrative positions in institutional research, institutional effectiveness, assessment, and academic affairs at Central Connecticut State University, the University of South Carolina-Aiken, and Trinity College in Washington, DC.


Tony JackAnthony (Tony) Jack
Junior Fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows
Assistant Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Show Bio

Anthony (Tony) Jack earned his Ph.D.in Sociology at Harvard University and is the Assistant Professor of Education at Harvard Graduate School of Education. Tony is interested in culture, education, race, urban poverty, children and youth, and social inequality. He examines the experiences of undergraduates at elite colleges and universities amidst expanding race- and class-based affirmative actions measures. He is interested in what influences undergraduates’ sense of belonging, their acquisition of cultural and social capital, boundary processes that influence intergroup relations, and how institutional policies affect these processes. His research uncovers the overlooked diversity among lower-income undergraduates: the Doubly Disadvantaged—those who enter college from local, typically distressed public high schools—and Privileged Poor—those who do so from boarding, day, and preparatory high schools. In so doing, he not only extends present day understandings of the social processes that shape youth’s acquisition of cultural capital and provides a more nuanced analysis of how social class affects the college experiences for poor youth, but also expands our understanding of how colleges can exacerbate preexisting inequalities. His work appears in the Du Bois Review and Sociological Forum. Tony holds fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the National Science Foundation, and is a graduate student affiliate at the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University. He is also a 2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow. Additionally, the New York Times, Boston Globe, The Huffington Post, and American RadioWorks have featured his research on lower-income college students as well as biographical profiles of his experiences of being a first-generation college student.

 


Micere KeelsMicere Keels
Associate Professor of Comparative Human Development
University of Chicago

Show Bio

Micere Keels is an Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Human Development, a faculty affiliate with the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, and a member of the Committee on Education at the University of Chicago. One strand of her research focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of the widening gender gap in educational attainment, a gap that is largest among Black and Latino/a Americans. Current research projects examine the educational gender gap at two points in the educational system: (1) kindergarten through third grade, and (2) during the first four years of college. She is also examining the romantic relationship and fertility consequences of an educationally imbalanced marriage market. The other strand of her research focuses on the intersection between neighborhood and school poverty, and inequality in public school choice. Current research projects examine the ways in which school-choice has affected the link between neighborhood of residence and school of attendance. Specifically, how public school choice is associated with the likelihood that middle-income families will reside in revitalizing urban neighborhoods by allowing them to opt out of the neighborhood public school. She received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University.


Robert Kelchen

Robert Kelchen
Assistant Professor of Education Leadership,
    Management and Policy
Seton Hall University

Show Bio

Robert Kelchen is an assistant professor of higher education in the Department of Education Leadership, Management and Policy at Seton Hall University. His research interests include student financial aid, higher education finance, and accountability policy, including college rankings and ratings. He has articles forthcoming in The Journal of Higher Education, The Journal of Education Finance, and the Journal of Student Financial Aid. His work as a methodologist for Washington Monthly magazine’s annual college rankings won an award for best data journalism from the Education Writers Association. His teaching interests include higher education finance, research methods, and governance and accountability policies and practices. He is frequently quoted in the media, including The Washington Post, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and Politico. He has also appeared on the Marketplace radio program, KABC radio, and MSNBC. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics and finance from Truman State University, a master’s degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a PhD in educational policy studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he worked on the Wisconsin Scholars Longitudinal Study from its inception in 2008 through 2013.


Nancy Kendall

Nancy Kendall
Associate Professor of Educational Policy Studies
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Show Bio

Nancy Kendall is associate professor of educational policy studies,specialized in comparative, international, and global education policy. She is affiliated with the African Studies Program, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, Development Studies Program, and Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Kendall conducts comparative ethnographic research on global development education policies and their intersections with children’s and families’ daily lives. Research projects have examined Education for All, gender and schooling, political democratization and educational governance, structural adjustment and education, sexuality and HIV/AIDS education, and childhood, vulnerability, and marginalization in education. Kendall has conducted extended research in Malawi, Mozambique, and the U.S., and has conducted short-term research in Colombia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Zimbabwe. Kendall was a 2009 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation postdoctoral fellow, and has received research support from the Fulbright Foundation, Social Science Research Council, TAG Philanthropic Foundation, and the Wenner-Gren Foundation, among others. She is the author of The Sex Education Debates (University of Chicago Press, 2012), and has published in journals including CICE, Compare, Comparative Education Review, International Journal of Educational Development, and Sexuality Research and Social Policy. She is currently working with the HOPE Lab to conduct a four-campus ethnographic study on how lower-income students experience the affordability of their first year of college.


Gregory Kienzl

Gregory Kienzl
Senior Research Associate
ACT, Inc.

Show Bio

Gregory Kienzl is a Senior Research Associate at ACT, Inc., where he leads a number of policy-relevant, postsecondary education-focused research projects. Prior to joining ACT, he served as the Director of Research and Evaluation for the Institute for Higher Education Policy and, before that, as the chief methodologist for an National Science Foundation-funded, multi-site research project at the University of Illinois that studied issues of underrepresentation in the STEM fields. He has authored or co-authored over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and US Department of Education-supported publications to his name, served on four Technical Review Panels for the National Center for Education Statistics covering the following topics: postsecondary faculty, first-time postsecondary education students, student financial aid, and career and technical education. Most of his research has focused on programs and policies that seek to improve access and success of traditionally underserved populations in higher education.


Tammy Kolbe

Tammy Kolbe
Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
University of Vermont

Show Bio

Tammy Kolbe is an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Vermont. Her research examines the allocation of resources in schools, and the cost effectiveness of educational programs and policies. Front and center in all her work is an interest in the extent to which education policies, practices and resources succeed or fail in achieving the goals of promoting an equitable, efficient, and adequate educational system for all students. In her most recent publications she examines trends instructional time and student learning, the cost effectiveness of educational programs for students at risk, variations in instructional quality across school districts, and the extent to which school resources impact identification and placement for students with disabilities. Her research has been published in numerous policy and practitioner-oriented reports and academic journals, including Teachers College Record, Educational Policy, and Educational Administration Quarterly. Kolbe holds an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis from the University of Vermont, a M.S. in Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation from the Pennsylvania State University, and a B.A. from Kalamazoo College.


Nathan Jones

Nathan Jones
Assistant Professor in Special Education
Boston University

Show Bio

Nathan Jones is an Assistant Professor in Special Education at Boston University. His research has focused on advancing methods for measuring the daily experiences of individuals. Across multiple studies, Nathan has leveraged the experienced sampling method (ESM) to collect repeated, in-the-moment reports of individuals’ time use and their affective responses to daily activities.  In working with the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, Nathan is utilizing a smartphone-based ESM application to collect quick snapshots of undergraduate students’ time use and engagement. This project is embedded within Sara Goldrick-Rab’s National Science Foundation study and is supported through a Spencer Foundation Small Research Grant. A former special education teacher, Nathan received a PhD in educational policy from Michigan State University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Northwestern University’s Institute for Policy Research.


Chris NewfieldChris Newfield
Professor of Literature and American Studies
University of California-Santa Barbara

Show Bio

Christopher Newfield is professor of literature and American Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. His main current areas of research are innovation theory and Critical University Studies, a new interdisciplinary field that he helped to found. Chris’ books include Mapping Multiculturalism (edited with Avery Gordon), The Emerson Effect: Individualism and Submission in America (Chicago, 1996), Ivy and Industry: Business and the Making of the American University, 1880-1980 (Duke, 2003), and Unmaking the Public University: The Forty Year Assault on the Middle Class (Harvard, 2008). His writing also covers American political psychology, race relations, science studies, the future of solar energy, and humanities-based approaches to economics. He teaches courses on Detective Fiction, California Noir, Innovation Studies, Critical Theory, the Future of Higher Education, and English Majoring After College, among others. He blogs on higher education funding and policy at Remaking the University, the Huffington Post, and the Chronicle of Higher Education, and is completing a film, What Happened to Solar Energy Innovation? and two books, Can Rich Countries Still Innovate? and Fast Food College: How to Stop Downsizing the Millennials’ Future.


Lindsay Page

Lindsay Page
Assistant Professor of Research Methodology
University of Pittsburgh

Show Bio

Lindsay Page is an assistant professor of research methodology at the School of Education and research scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Her work focuses on quantitative methods and their application to questions regarding the effectiveness of educational policies and programs across the pre-school to postsecondary spectrum. Much of her recent work has focused on implementing large-scale randomized trials to investigate potential solutions to “summer melt,” the phenomenon that college-intending students fail to transition successfully from high school to college.  Lindsay’s research has been published in a variety of academic journals, and she is the co-author of a new book on summer melt published by the Harvard Education Press. Page is grateful for the generous financial support that her work has received from a variety of sources, including: the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Heckscher Foundation for Children, the Institute for Education Sciences, the Lindback Foundation, NASFAA, the Spencer Foundation, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and the William T. Grant Foundation. She holds a doctorate in quantitative policy analysis from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, master's degrees in statistics and in education policy from Harvard, and a bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College.


Miguel Palacios

Miguel Palacios
Assistant Professor of Finance
Vanderbilt University

Show Bio

Miguel Palacios is an Assistant Professor of Finance at the Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University.  His recent work focuses on the intersection of human capital and asset-pricing, studying the size and riskiness of human capital, and measuring the effect that human capital has on the riskiness of firms.  Miguel has also worked on alternative instruments for financing education.  On this subject he published Investing in Human Capital (Cambridge University Press, 2004) and co-founded Lumni Inc.  Lumni, which is a practical implementation of the ideas presented in his book, has financed students in Chile, Colombia, México, Perú and the United States.  Miguel holds a Ph.D. in Business Administration — finance — and an M.A. in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.B.A. from the Darden Business School, University of Virginia, and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Universidad de los Andes, Colombia.


Josipa Roksa

Josipa Roksa
Associate Professor of Sociology and Education
University of Virginia

Show Bio

Josipa Roksa is Associate Professor of Sociology and Education at the University of Virginia.  Her research has focused on understanding class, race and gender inequalities in higher education.  She has examined a range of topics, from remedial education and transfer between two-year and four-year institutions, to the role of state contexts in shaping access and attainment in higher education, and the importance of life course transitions, including work, marriage/cohabitation and parenthood, for educational success.  This research been published in a range of peer-reviewed journals, including Social Forces, Sociology of Education, Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Teachers College Record, Review of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and Social Science Research. In addition, she has examined how much students learn in higher education and what consequences that has for their lives beyond college, co-authoring two recent volumes: Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses (University of Chicago Press, 2011) and Aspiring Adults Adrift: Tentative Transitions of College Graduates (University of Chicago Press, 2014). Josipa’s work has been funded by a number of foundations, including Spencer and Teagle Foundations, as well as the National Science Foundation.  She is a co-PI with Sara Goldrick-Rab on an NSF-funded project entitled “The Price of STEM Success: Explaining the Impact of Need-Based Financial Aid on STEM Student Behavior.”


Lauren Schudde

Lauren Schudde
Assistant Professor of Educational Administration
The University of Texas at Austin 

Show Bio

Lauren Schudde is an assistant professor of higher education leadership at The University of Texas at Austin. She studies processes that contribute to socioeconomic inequalities in postsecondary degree attainment and labor market outcomes, including the unintended consequences of federal policies. She holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining UT, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Community College Research Center at Teacher’s College of Columbia University. Her research has received financial support from the National Academy of Education and Spencer Foundation, the American College Personnel Association, the Institute of Education Sciences, and the Institute for Research on Poverty.


Amy E. Traver

Amy E. Traver
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Queensborough Community College of the City University of
    New York (CUNY)

Show Bio

Amy E. Traver is an Associate Professor of Sociology and of Education at Queensborough Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY). Her research interests include student success in community colleges, experiential pedagogies in community college contexts, and the community college pathways of former foster youth. Her most recent publications in these areas include an article in Internet and Higher Education (with Volchok, Bidjerano, and Shea) and Service-Learning at the American Community College (with Perel Katz for Palgrave Macmillan), an edited volume reviewed as a “must read” that “suggests a strategy for reconsidering the priorities and practices of higher education.” She teaches Introduction to Sociology, Sociology of Education, Sociology of Family, and Sociology of Gender, as well as Contemporary Education: Principles and Practices. Through her teaching, she is active in a number of national initiatives in higher education, including projects supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Association for American Colleges and Universities, and the Teagle Foundation. She is a graduate of Colgate University (B.A., 1997), Harvard University (Ed.M., 1999), and the State University of New York at Stony Brook (Ph.D., 2008).